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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
today, the obama administration is willing to go over the fiscal cliff if republicans don't agree to raising taxes on the rich. all this week we've been focusing on what it is about this congress and this administration that makes it seem like compromise is a dirty word. certainly the extremes in the party seem to view it that way. we've been talking with past congressional leaders who have sat down at the negotiating table, facing sharp differences with the other political party in the past and still managing to come out with a deal. today i spoke a short while ago with trent lott, author of "herding cats: a life in politics." >> senator lott, you and senator mitchell wrote op-eds. you said one solution is to hold congress at hearings, marking up legislation. most americans would agree with that but be surprised to hear, i mean, that's their job. i think most of us, you know, would assume, isn't that their job description? >> well, they've slowly slipped away. for several years now. they don't do appropriations bills before the end of the fiscal year, not even before the end of t
. >> eric, all during this presidential election, we heard from both republicans and democrats saying look, this is a clear choice between romney and between obama, and it was very clear on obama wanted tax raise for the highest income americans. didn't the american people make that choice in voting for him, the electoral college and the popular vote? so isn't it incumbent on republicans to at least accept some upper income tax raise there? >> i think that the american public voted for the status quo. they voted for the gridlock that they had before the election. i think it's a little foolish of the american people to think they are going to get something different based on what they voted for. >> you think they want the status quo? >> -- largely for redistricting. well, they voted for it. whether they wanted it or not, to think these people are going to change long-held habits based on one election, i think is a little bit silly. we're going to have gridlock in washington and frankly, i think gridlock is a good thing, not a bad thing. it keeps congress from taking away more liberties. >>
president obama and speaker boehner are to a deal? and from your perspective, is a bad deal better than no deal? >> a bad deal is a bad deal and we shouldn't accept it. republicans have the problem that all of the polls show the vast majority of american people, and people who have done well in america should do well by america and start paying america back. this tax break, even george bush didn't want it to be permanent. somehow, republicans have gotten hung up on this one thing, turning tax law into theology. they can't let it go. it has united the democratic party against them, and now mostly american people are on the debate. we can't talk about spending until we get out of the corner. >> how much of the republican opposition is based on principle, to the raising of taxes on the weltiest is based on principle and how much is based on a fear that they may face a challenge from more conservatives in the party? >> i think it's impossible to know the second one. there are a number of people in potentially vulnerable situations where they have to look over their right shoulder and worry
that will pay. that's what he said today. yesterday, president obama said something that was very, very important. he offered the outlines of a deal that might work with republicans. that's something we talked about on your show a couple nights ago, anderson. that is, raise the rates now and then engage in conversations next year on tax discussions and loopholes. and that's called base broadening. base broadening in the past has been attached to lowering the rates. lowering the rates. that's what happened in 1986 with tax reform. so, what the president is saying, there is a way to raise rates temporarily. but through further reform you say you're interested in, we could lower them back down next year. >> david, you've been critical of the president and democrats. do you still think they're overplaying their hand here? >> i think there are people around the president who are more interested or at least have a strong interest in using this as a way to humiliate republicans as a way to push them to the brink, as opposed to negotiating. we'll have to wait to see how it plays out. i think wh
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)